MAKING THE MOST OF OVERCAST WEATHER - CAPTURE TO PROCESSING

MAKING THE MOST OF OVERCAST WEATHER - CAPTURE TO PROCESSING

I love colourful sunrises and sunsets with beautiful warm golden light illuminating the landscape, but when you’ve dragged yourself out of bed in the dark and up a mountain and the weather doesn’t give you what you want, there’s still the possibility to capture stark moody landscapes.

MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY - CAPTURE TO EDITING

MOUNTAIN PHOTOGRAPHY - CAPTURE TO EDITING

Last month I spent a week or so in the snowy Dolomites mountains and put together this video about shooting an image from capturing the scene to my complete image editing workflow. We weren’t that lucky with the conditions, either having too much wind and driving snow, or completely clear skies with no drama, but landscape photography is usually about taking the scene as you find it and working out how best to shoot and edit a scene to fit the mood of a place.

THOUGHTS ON WHY WE DO LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY & TAKING MORE SATISFYING IMAGES

THOUGHTS ON WHY WE DO LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY & TAKING MORE SATISFYING IMAGES

The ideas in this video have been buzzing around my head for a while now and this is an attempt to try to identify what it is that compels us to head out into the landscape to make images, and whether an understanding of that can help us to take better photos...or at least images we’re more satisfied with.

7 TIPS FOR WINTER PHOTOGRAPHY

7 TIPS FOR WINTER PHOTOGRAPHY

Winter is upon us and in my latest video I look at seven tips, artistic and practical, for taking landscape photography images in winter.

2 ESSENTIAL LENSES FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

2 ESSENTIAL LENSES FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

How many lenses do you really need for landscape photography? I really believe that two lenses is enough for the vast majority of landscape photography, and that that, the less gear we haul up a mountain with us, the lighter we travel, the clearer our mind is to make images when we get to our destination.

7 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS I'VE LEARNED IN LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY - VIDEO

7 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS I'VE LEARNED IN LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY - VIDEO

There are certain tips and pieces of advice that I find myself giving more than anything else during workshops or in response to email enquiries, and in this video I've tried to put them all together.

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN ICELAND

AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY IN ICELAND

Last month I spent around 3 weeks in Iceland running a couple of landscape photography workshops there.  Between the two workshops we had a day off and along with a couple of the participants, I decided to take the opportunity to do a photography flight above the river deltas and highlands.  It's something I've wanted to do for a couple of years and it really didn't disappoint.

USING LIGHT IN LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY - VIDEO

USING LIGHT IN LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY - VIDEO

Light is the raw material of photography and “good light” is something all landscape photographers seek.  In this video I take a look at the quality of light at different times of day and in different weather conditions, focusing on the golden hour, the blue hour and overcast light.

VIDEO - HOW TO SHOOT LONG EXPOSURES

VIDEO - HOW TO SHOOT LONG EXPOSURES

Since I first started landscape photography I’ve always enjoyed making long exposure images of water. I love the surreal feel it gives the landscape, and in this video I discuss the gear and technique required to shoot them at one of my favourite locations in Carrasquiera, Portugal

VIDEO - 6 REASONS WHY YOU NEED A TELEPHOTO LENS FOR LANDSCAPES

VIDEO - 6 REASONS WHY YOU NEED A TELEPHOTO LENS FOR LANDSCAPES

Wide angles are the obvious choice for a lens when shooting landscapes, but there are plenty of times when you really need to have a telephoto lens in your camera bag to get the most out of a scene.

VIDEO - 6 TIPS FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION

VIDEO - 6 TIPS FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION

Composition is one of the most important aspects of creating good photographs...and because of it’s abstract nature perhaps one of the trickiest to understand. Just what is the best way to arrange the various separate elements of a three dimensional scene into an effective and cleanly composed two dimensional image?